...until there's not enough
newsweek:

Most marriages don’t last nearly as long as Irven Gordon’s Volvo P1800 has lasted. And most couples probably don’t spend as much time together as Irv has spent in his beloved car. Irv says he hadn’t even heard of Volvos until a few days before he bought the car, on June 30, 1966.
At the time, he was fed up with his turbocharged 1963 Corvair Spyder, which he says was constantly making him late for his middle school science teaching job by breaking down en route. While thumbing through a Car and Driver with a car savvy friend, he stumbled upon an ad for the local Volvo dealership, with a photo of a P1800.
“These are great cars,” the friend told him. So down he went to Volvoville in Huntington, NY, and took a P1800 convertible for a spin. He drove for three hours, and then bought the much less expensive coupe, for $4,150, or $30,000 in current dollars, approximately his then annual salary. That first weekend, Irv rolled 1,500 miles, returning to the dealership on Monday for his car’s first checkup. He hadn’t planned to drive through the weekend, but he says he was having too much fun to stop—up to Boston, down to Philly, and all over in between before returning to his home on Long Island. He’s been driving the P1800 enthusiastically ever since. On September 24th of last year, he hit 3 million miles.
The Man For Whom They Made The Three Million Mile Badge)

I want to figure out how much money this saved him over the years - maintaining rather than discarding. What would you guess?

newsweek:

Most marriages don’t last nearly as long as Irven Gordon’s Volvo P1800 has lasted. And most couples probably don’t spend as much time together as Irv has spent in his beloved car. Irv says he hadn’t even heard of Volvos until a few days before he bought the car, on June 30, 1966.

At the time, he was fed up with his turbocharged 1963 Corvair Spyder, which he says was constantly making him late for his middle school science teaching job by breaking down en route. While thumbing through a Car and Driver with a car savvy friend, he stumbled upon an ad for the local Volvo dealership, with a photo of a P1800.

“These are great cars,” the friend told him. So down he went to Volvoville in Huntington, NY, and took a P1800 convertible for a spin. He drove for three hours, and then bought the much less expensive coupe, for $4,150, or $30,000 in current dollars, approximately his then annual salary. That first weekend, Irv rolled 1,500 miles, returning to the dealership on Monday for his car’s first checkup. He hadn’t planned to drive through the weekend, but he says he was having too much fun to stop—up to Boston, down to Philly, and all over in between before returning to his home on Long Island. He’s been driving the P1800 enthusiastically ever since. On September 24th of last year, he hit 3 million miles.

The Man For Whom They Made The Three Million Mile Badge)

I want to figure out how much money this saved him over the years - maintaining rather than discarding. What would you guess?

What’s your definition of wealth?
I read an interesting post today, and the author defined wealth as this: 




If you have enough assets plus passive income to cover your personal lifestyle expenses for the rest of your life, and that money allows you to work at something you love – without concern for the amount of compensation – then you are wealthy.




That’s a pretty spot on definition - especially because it doesn’t specify an amount of money. The amount that makes you feel wealthy is completely up to you and no one else. Anything you’d add to it?

What’s your definition of wealth?

I read an interesting post today, and the author defined wealth as this:

If you have enough assets plus passive income to cover your personal lifestyle expenses for the rest of your life, and that money allows you to work at something you love – without concern for the amount of compensation – then you are wealthy.

That’s a pretty spot on definition - especially because it doesn’t specify an amount of money. The amount that makes you feel wealthy is completely up to you and no one else. Anything you’d add to it?