When applying for a job, always put “negotiable” when the application asks about your desired salary. Try to avoid talking about money and benefits until after they make you an offer.

A company is more likely to agree to a higher salary after they’ve decided that they want you for the job. This is due to a psychological tendency called “loss aversion”. If you bring up money before the offer is made, it could hurt your chances of even being considered if it’s higher than they expect to pay. 

When we remember our past selves, they seem quite different. We know how much our personalities and tastes have changed over the years. But when we look ahead, somehow we expect ourselves to stay the same, a team of psychologists said Thursday, describing research they conducted of people’s self-perceptions.

They called this phenomenon the “end of history illusion,” in which people tend to “underestimate how much they will change in the future.” According to their research, which involved more than 19,000 people ages 18 to 68, the illusion persists from teenage years into retirement.

Translation: For crying out loud, put a little money away for retirement. You may enjoy sleeping on a broken futon in an apartment that you share with 6 of your best friends now, but don’t assume that Future You will. Worst case scenario, Future You still enjoys living like a college student and has a bunch of money.

The M.I.N.I. Guide to Black Friday

Don’t participate.

It’s a hype tactic used by stores to get you in and make you spend more than you normally would. You’ll buy things you’d never purchase on a regular day simply because “you couldn’t pass up such a great deal!”

There’s a reason that 50” flat screen is only $250—it’s a piece of crap.

So there you go. Short and sweet. Enjoy those extra precious hours of sleep!

In a recent study by Saleforce’s social performance management division, Rypple, some startling revelations came to light. Recognition, for example, was one of the key factors that employees felt were lacking at their profession. Nearly 70% of employees said they would work harder if they were better recognized for their efforts.
planetmoney

newyorker:

The two-thousand-dollar Popsicle made a mockery of nearly every financial consideration of the summer: How much summer camp we could afford? Would we able to rent a place in the country for a week, or a weekend? What about Whole Foods? Two thousand dollars was exactly the sort of sum I was protecting.

It’s amazing how losing a large sum of money can change your perspective of it. Instead of denying yourself the pleasure of spending it in order to save, you suddenly begin fixating on all of the things you could have bought with it.

This phenomenon can help, though. Use it to adopt a healthy spending mentality by imagining yourself in a situation where you lose a sizable amount of money. With the money theoretically gone, what’s the first thing you think about missing out on? It might be something practical, or it could be totally fun and useless. Either way, that thing/experience is what will most likely bring you the most happiness or relieve the most stress.

longreads
longreads:

[Not single-page] Does having more money make a person have less empathy?

Earlier this year, Piff, who is 30, published a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that made him semi-famous. Titled ‘Higher Social Class Predicts Increased Unethical Behavior,’ it showed through quizzes, online games, questionnaires, in-lab manipulations, and field studies that living high on the socioeconomic ladder can, colloquially speaking, dehumanize people. It can make them less ethical, more selfish, more insular, and less compassionate than other people. It can make them more likely, as Piff demonstrated in one of his experiments, to take candy from a bowl of sweets designated for children. ‘While having money doesn’t necessarily make anybody anything,’ Piff says, ‘the rich are way more likely to prioritize their own self-interests above the interests of other people. It makes them more likely to exhibit characteristics that we would stereotypically associate with, say, assholes.’

“The Money-Empathy Gap.” — Lisa Miller, New York magazine
More from Miller

Maybe that’s why it’s so refreshing to meet a wealthy person that isn’t like this at all.

longreads:

[Not single-page] Does having more money make a person have less empathy?

Earlier this year, Piff, who is 30, published a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that made him semi-famous. Titled ‘Higher Social Class Predicts Increased Unethical Behavior,’ it showed through quizzes, online games, questionnaires, in-lab manipulations, and field studies that living high on the socioeconomic ladder can, colloquially speaking, dehumanize people. It can make them less ethical, more selfish, more insular, and less compassionate than other people. It can make them more likely, as Piff demonstrated in one of his experiments, to take candy from a bowl of sweets designated for children. ‘While having money doesn’t necessarily make anybody anything,’ Piff says, ‘the rich are way more likely to prioritize their own self-interests above the interests of other people. It makes them more likely to exhibit characteristics that we would stereotypically associate with, say, assholes.’

“The Money-Empathy Gap.” — Lisa Miller, New York magazine

More from Miller

Maybe that’s why it’s so refreshing to meet a wealthy person that isn’t like this at all.

After all of the pain that the recession has caused, it seems that there is a silver lining.  We have reset our brains to appreciate form, function, and meaning over cost.
For instance, the Casio watch above was featured in GQ this month in an article they did about the 1980s digital watch coming back in style.  They said this watch only costs $25, but you can actually get it for around $17 on Amazon. No, I did not forget a zero.
Also, many couples are opting for smaller, intimate weddings instead of the mega-events that cost as much as a new Mercedes.
At some point, we began to put too much emphasis on price as an indicator of value.  However, it seems the recession helped snap us out of that mindset.
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After all of the pain that the recession has caused, it seems that there is a silver lining.  We have reset our brains to appreciate form, function, and meaning over cost.

For instance, the Casio watch above was featured in GQ this month in an article they did about the 1980s digital watch coming back in style.  They said this watch only costs $25, but you can actually get it for around $17 on Amazon. No, I did not forget a zero.

Also, many couples are opting for smaller, intimate weddings instead of the mega-events that cost as much as a new Mercedes.

At some point, we began to put too much emphasis on price as an indicator of value.  However, it seems the recession helped snap us out of that mindset.

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What’s the point of spending time doing nice things for others? Is it purely a feel-good experience for the nice person, or is there a greater impact on others, and on the world in general? In fact, it is official – researchers have shown that generosity is contagious. And not only is it contagious, but one act of kindness is actually shown to breed another act of kindness, and so on. Kindness can multiply and move on from person to person.
The Multiplier Effect | Psychology Today