...until there's not enough

...until there's not enough

#psychology

When applying for a job, always put “negotiable” when the application asks about your desired salary. Try to avoid talking about money and benefits until after they make you an offer.

A company is more likely to agree to a higher salary after they’ve decided that they want you for the job. This is due to a psychological tendency called “loss aversion”. If you bring up money before the offer is made, it could hurt your chances of even being considered if it’s higher than they expect to pay. 

The M.I.N.I. Guide to Black Friday

Don’t participate.

It’s a hype tactic used by stores to get you in and make you spend more than you normally would. You’ll buy things you’d never purchase on a regular day simply because “you couldn’t pass up such a great deal!”

There’s a reason that 50” flat screen is only $250—it’s a piece of crap.

So there you go. Short and sweet. Enjoy those extra precious hours of sleep!

In a recent study by Saleforce’s social performance management division, Rypple, some startling revelations came to light. Recognition, for example, was one of the key factors that employees felt were lacking at their profession. Nearly 70% of employees said they would work harder if they were better recognized for their efforts.
longreads:

[Not single-page] Does having more money make a person have less empathy?

Earlier this year, Piff, who is 30, published a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that made him semi-famous. Titled ‘Higher Social Class Predicts Increased Unethical Behavior,’ it showed through quizzes, online games, questionnaires, in-lab manipulations, and field studies that living high on the socioeconomic ladder can, colloquially speaking, dehumanize people. It can make them less ethical, more selfish, more insular, and less compassionate than other people. It can make them more likely, as Piff demonstrated in one of his experiments, to take candy from a bowl of sweets designated for children. ‘While having money doesn’t necessarily make anybody anything,’ Piff says, ‘the rich are way more likely to prioritize their own self-interests above the interests of other people. It makes them more likely to exhibit characteristics that we would stereotypically associate with, say, assholes.’

“The Money-Empathy Gap.” — Lisa Miller, New York magazine
More from Miller

Maybe that’s why it’s so refreshing to meet a wealthy person that isn’t like this at all.

longreads:

[Not single-page] Does having more money make a person have less empathy?

Earlier this year, Piff, who is 30, published a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that made him semi-famous. Titled ‘Higher Social Class Predicts Increased Unethical Behavior,’ it showed through quizzes, online games, questionnaires, in-lab manipulations, and field studies that living high on the socioeconomic ladder can, colloquially speaking, dehumanize people. It can make them less ethical, more selfish, more insular, and less compassionate than other people. It can make them more likely, as Piff demonstrated in one of his experiments, to take candy from a bowl of sweets designated for children. ‘While having money doesn’t necessarily make anybody anything,’ Piff says, ‘the rich are way more likely to prioritize their own self-interests above the interests of other people. It makes them more likely to exhibit characteristics that we would stereotypically associate with, say, assholes.’

“The Money-Empathy Gap.” — Lisa Miller, New York magazine

More from Miller

Maybe that’s why it’s so refreshing to meet a wealthy person that isn’t like this at all.