...until there's not enough

#diy

museumofusefulthings:

40 Uses for WD-40: 
1. Protects silver from tarnishing. 
2. Removes road tar and grime from cars. 
3. Cleans and lubricates guitar strings. 
4. Gives floors that ‘just-waxed’ sheen without making them slippery. 
5. Keeps flies off cows. (I love this one!) 
6. Restores and cleans chalkboards. 
7. Removes lipstick stains. 
8. Loosens stubborn zippers. 
9. Untangles jewelry chains. 
10. Removes stains from stainless steel sinks. 

Read on…
WD-40 is one of the best substances ever put in an aerosol can. It’s a simple way to maintain your stuff and avoid costly repair bills.
museumofusefulthings:

40 Uses for WD-40: 
1. Protects silver from tarnishing. 
2. Removes road tar and grime from cars. 
3. Cleans and lubricates guitar strings. 
4. Gives floors that ‘just-waxed’ sheen without making them slippery. 
5. Keeps flies off cows. (I love this one!) 
6. Restores and cleans chalkboards. 
7. Removes lipstick stains. 
8. Loosens stubborn zippers. 
9. Untangles jewelry chains. 
10. Removes stains from stainless steel sinks. 

Read on…
WD-40 is one of the best substances ever put in an aerosol can. It’s a simple way to maintain your stuff and avoid costly repair bills.

museumofusefulthings:

40 Uses for WD-40:

1. Protects silver from tarnishing.

2. Removes road tar and grime from cars.

3. Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.

4. Gives floors that ‘just-waxed’ sheen without making them slippery.

5. Keeps flies off cows. (I love this one!)

6. Restores and cleans chalkboards.

7. Removes lipstick stains.

8. Loosens stubborn zippers.

9. Untangles jewelry chains.

10. Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.

Read on…

WD-40 is one of the best substances ever put in an aerosol can. It’s a simple way to maintain your stuff and avoid costly repair bills.

It’s always important to support the ventures of your friends and family, which is why I wanted to give a shout out to my good buddy, Kyle, this morning.  He’s expecting a baby boy in March, and he’s finished several awesome woodworking projects for the nursery.

I was excited to hear that he’s decided to offer up his services by setting up a page on Etsy.  Many of his creations are inspired by what he sees in Pottery Barn catalogs, and he offers them at a significant savings compared to what you’ll see in their stores.

Browse his offerings by clicking here, and feel free to contact him if you have a specific design in mind.

How I Saved 8.7% on a Home Improvement Project

So, the tile in our master bathroom shower was falling apart, and I knew that it needed to be redone before I had some serious water damage to repair.

I’m doing the work myself, but tools and materials aren’t cheap.  I was looking for any potential savings that I could find.

If I’m buying a bunch of big stuff from Home Depot or Lowe’s, I like to order it online and then pick it up in the store.  They will put your order together and have it waiting for you at the customer service desk.  It saves you from having to navigate the store while carrying a bunch of 8 foot sheets of plywood.

Typically, when I buy something online, I’ll do a quick search for any promotional codes to cut down on the cost.  Unfortunately, there weren’t any for Lowe’s at that time.

Then, it dawned on me that there are services out there like Cardpool that let you buy discounted gift cards.  Low and behold, they had Lowe’s gift cards that you could buy at an 8.7% discount.  So, I selected enough gift cards to cover my order, and chose electronic ones so that they would be emailed to me right away.

Once the gift cards showed up in my email, I simply entered my order online for in-store pickup and paid for it with the gift cards.  I had about $735 worth of gift cards, but I only paid $671 for them.

So, for about 2 minutes of work, I saved myself $64.

Keep in mind, they have gift cards from all different types of retailers and restaurants, but it’s probably only worth it if you have a big purchase coming up.

Have any of you done something like this successfully?

How Do You Know When to Hire a Professional?
Taking care of household projects yourself can save you a TON of money.  However, there’s a point when you need to call in the pros.  The problem is, it’s difficult to know when something is worth your time, and when it’s better to pay someone to do it for you.  Here’s a good rule of thumb I use to make the decision:
First, determine your hourly rate at work.  Second, figure out how much it would cost to hire a professional.  Now, divide the cost of paying the professional by your hourly pay rate.  This will give you the number of hours it would take you to earn that sum of money.  If you believe that you are able to complete the project in less time than this, you should do it yourself.  You need to be honest with yourself, and be sure to include the amount of time that it takes to learn how to do something, buy the proper tools, and complete the job.
Here’s an example.  We recently had some roof damage that needed to be repaired.  Now, I’ve tackled several home improvement projects in my day, but I know nothing about roof repair.  I consider the roof to be a pretty important part of the house, so I wanted it done right.  It would have taken me hours upon hours upon hours to research what might be causing the problem, figure out how it needed to be repaired, make trips back and forth to the hardware store for tools and materials, and redo portions of my work as I made mistakes. 
It was obvious that my time would be better spent paying a professional to do the job, and make up the lost funds by spending a few extra hours at the office.  To me, that seems like a much better use of my time as opposed to hours of frustration and no guarantee that I’ll be able to complete the job correctly.
How Do You Know When to Hire a Professional?
Taking care of household projects yourself can save you a TON of money.  However, there’s a point when you need to call in the pros.  The problem is, it’s difficult to know when something is worth your time, and when it’s better to pay someone to do it for you.  Here’s a good rule of thumb I use to make the decision:
First, determine your hourly rate at work.  Second, figure out how much it would cost to hire a professional.  Now, divide the cost of paying the professional by your hourly pay rate.  This will give you the number of hours it would take you to earn that sum of money.  If you believe that you are able to complete the project in less time than this, you should do it yourself.  You need to be honest with yourself, and be sure to include the amount of time that it takes to learn how to do something, buy the proper tools, and complete the job.
Here’s an example.  We recently had some roof damage that needed to be repaired.  Now, I’ve tackled several home improvement projects in my day, but I know nothing about roof repair.  I consider the roof to be a pretty important part of the house, so I wanted it done right.  It would have taken me hours upon hours upon hours to research what might be causing the problem, figure out how it needed to be repaired, make trips back and forth to the hardware store for tools and materials, and redo portions of my work as I made mistakes. 
It was obvious that my time would be better spent paying a professional to do the job, and make up the lost funds by spending a few extra hours at the office.  To me, that seems like a much better use of my time as opposed to hours of frustration and no guarantee that I’ll be able to complete the job correctly.

How Do You Know When to Hire a Professional?

Taking care of household projects yourself can save you a TON of money.  However, there’s a point when you need to call in the pros.  The problem is, it’s difficult to know when something is worth your time, and when it’s better to pay someone to do it for you.  Here’s a good rule of thumb I use to make the decision:

First, determine your hourly rate at work.  Second, figure out how much it would cost to hire a professional.  Now, divide the cost of paying the professional by your hourly pay rate.  This will give you the number of hours it would take you to earn that sum of money.  If you believe that you are able to complete the project in less time than this, you should do it yourself.  You need to be honest with yourself, and be sure to include the amount of time that it takes to learn how to do something, buy the proper tools, and complete the job.

Here’s an example.  We recently had some roof damage that needed to be repaired.  Now, I’ve tackled several home improvement projects in my day, but I know nothing about roof repair.  I consider the roof to be a pretty important part of the house, so I wanted it done right.  It would have taken me hours upon hours upon hours to research what might be causing the problem, figure out how it needed to be repaired, make trips back and forth to the hardware store for tools and materials, and redo portions of my work as I made mistakes. 

It was obvious that my time would be better spent paying a professional to do the job, and make up the lost funds by spending a few extra hours at the office.  To me, that seems like a much better use of my time as opposed to hours of frustration and no guarantee that I’ll be able to complete the job correctly.