...until there's not enough

...until there's not enough

#autos

newsweek:

Most marriages don’t last nearly as long as Irven Gordon’s Volvo P1800 has lasted. And most couples probably don’t spend as much time together as Irv has spent in his beloved car. Irv says he hadn’t even heard of Volvos until a few days before he bought the car, on June 30, 1966.
At the time, he was fed up with his turbocharged 1963 Corvair Spyder, which he says was constantly making him late for his middle school science teaching job by breaking down en route. While thumbing through a Car and Driver with a car savvy friend, he stumbled upon an ad for the local Volvo dealership, with a photo of a P1800.
“These are great cars,” the friend told him. So down he went to Volvoville in Huntington, NY, and took a P1800 convertible for a spin. He drove for three hours, and then bought the much less expensive coupe, for $4,150, or $30,000 in current dollars, approximately his then annual salary. That first weekend, Irv rolled 1,500 miles, returning to the dealership on Monday for his car’s first checkup. He hadn’t planned to drive through the weekend, but he says he was having too much fun to stop—up to Boston, down to Philly, and all over in between before returning to his home on Long Island. He’s been driving the P1800 enthusiastically ever since. On September 24th of last year, he hit 3 million miles.
The Man For Whom They Made The Three Million Mile Badge)

I want to figure out how much money this saved him over the years - maintaining rather than discarding. What would you guess?

newsweek:

Most marriages don’t last nearly as long as Irven Gordon’s Volvo P1800 has lasted. And most couples probably don’t spend as much time together as Irv has spent in his beloved car. Irv says he hadn’t even heard of Volvos until a few days before he bought the car, on June 30, 1966.

At the time, he was fed up with his turbocharged 1963 Corvair Spyder, which he says was constantly making him late for his middle school science teaching job by breaking down en route. While thumbing through a Car and Driver with a car savvy friend, he stumbled upon an ad for the local Volvo dealership, with a photo of a P1800.

“These are great cars,” the friend told him. So down he went to Volvoville in Huntington, NY, and took a P1800 convertible for a spin. He drove for three hours, and then bought the much less expensive coupe, for $4,150, or $30,000 in current dollars, approximately his then annual salary. That first weekend, Irv rolled 1,500 miles, returning to the dealership on Monday for his car’s first checkup. He hadn’t planned to drive through the weekend, but he says he was having too much fun to stop—up to Boston, down to Philly, and all over in between before returning to his home on Long Island. He’s been driving the P1800 enthusiastically ever since. On September 24th of last year, he hit 3 million miles.

The Man For Whom They Made The Three Million Mile Badge)

I want to figure out how much money this saved him over the years - maintaining rather than discarding. What would you guess?

Don’t make big purchases after an emotional event

Let me start by saying that I’m probably more emotionally invested in Oklahoma Sooners football than I should be.  Today, we lost to our arch rival, the Texas Longhorns.  It was unexpected, and it sucks.

Several years ago, we were in the market for a car.  We decided to go look at some after a similar loss.  We ended up purchasing a car that we regretted a few months down the road.  It was too expensive, and it wasn’t even what we really wanted.  Looking back, we were bummed by our team’s loss, and it really clouded our judgement on that one.  We wanted to feel better, and the car was exciting.

You may or may not be into football, but this advice holds true for everyone.  Whether it’s a positive or negative emotional event, make it a point to put off big financial decisions until you come back down to earth.

Look at these fees for renewing your car registration online

AUTOMATION FEE - 2.00
MAIL IN FEE - 1.00
Electronic Processing (NON-REFUNDABLE) - 2.00

"Automation fee" - I’m assuming that’s for doing it online, fine.

"Mail in fee" - Wait, what? I’m doing it online…

"Electronic processing" - I THOUGHT THAT WAS THE AUTOMATION FEE ARRGGHGGHGHGHGH!!!

Next time, don’t feel the need to be so sneaky. Just put "P.S. We’re also stealing $5 from you", and I’ll respect your honesty.

Duke Grad Student Secretly Lived In A Van To Escape Loan Debt

He took out the back row of seats, which left plenty of room for “furnishings.” He used a plastic bin to store food, supplies and school materials.

That’s pretty awesome.  I once spent a good part of two weeks living out of an Isuzu Rodeo on a road trip, and that was enough for me.  Kudos to Ken for his creativity and willingness to live against the grain.

Check out his book, Walden on Wheels: On the Open Road from Debt to Freedom

cnbc:

Sandy Helps Push Gasoline Prices Lower
Gasoline prices are likely to keep falling, after Super Storm Sandy shut down highways and air travel across the East Coast. Gasoline at the pump continued to decline, with the national average for unleaded regular $3.53, a penny lower than Monday and 11 cents cheaper than a week ago. 
Full story

An interesting turn of events! So few people have been driving since Sandy that it’s enough to overcome the disrupted supply.

cnbc:

Sandy Helps Push Gasoline Prices Lower

Gasoline prices are likely to keep falling, after Super Storm Sandy shut down highways and air travel across the East Coast. Gasoline at the pump continued to decline, with the national average for unleaded regular $3.53, a penny lower than Monday and 11 cents cheaper than a week ago.
 

Full story

An interesting turn of events! So few people have been driving since Sandy that it’s enough to overcome the disrupted supply.
Articles like this make me shake my head.
I’m all for cutting back on the amount of fuel used to help the environment, but simply posing it as a money issue is only fueling the histeria (yes, pun intended!) surrounding gas prices.
Admit it.  We start to act a little crazy when gas prices go up a few cents.  It’s because we face the problem every time we fill up, and we are reminded of it every time we pass by a gas station sign.  Purely from a psychological standpoint, it’s no wonder that it drives us nuts (yes, pun intended again!).
We start to drive across town to save 5 cents, become driving hazards by attempting to coast everywhere, and spend precious time pouring over articles on how to improve our fuel efficiency by 7%.
The fact is, we all have bigger fish to fry.  By that, I mean we all have other issues to work on that have a much greater impact on our financial lives.

Articles like this make me shake my head.

I’m all for cutting back on the amount of fuel used to help the environment, but simply posing it as a money issue is only fueling the histeria (yes, pun intended!) surrounding gas prices.

Admit it.  We start to act a little crazy when gas prices go up a few cents.  It’s because we face the problem every time we fill up, and we are reminded of it every time we pass by a gas station sign.  Purely from a psychological standpoint, it’s no wonder that it drives us nuts (yes, pun intended again!).

We start to drive across town to save 5 cents, become driving hazards by attempting to coast everywhere, and spend precious time pouring over articles on how to improve our fuel efficiency by 7%.

The fact is, we all have bigger fish to fry.  By that, I mean we all have other issues to work on that have a much greater impact on our financial lives.

Technology That Saves You Money
Have you ever been ripped off by a mechanic?  If not, you probably don’t own a car.
Mechanics are notorious for inflating the seriousness of your car problems, and the only way to combat it is to be informed.
If your car’s check engine light comes on, or it starts making a weird sound, plug in an Auto Scanner to get an idea of what the problem could be.  When you take it to the mechanic, tell them up front that you know what the problem is.  The more you appear to be informed, the less likely they are to try and rip you off.  
It could pay for itself in one visit to the shop.
Some auto parts stores will scan your car’s computer for free, but you can’t always guarantee that you’ll be able to make it to one when there’s a problem with your car.

Technology That Saves You Money

Have you ever been ripped off by a mechanic?  If not, you probably don’t own a car.

Mechanics are notorious for inflating the seriousness of your car problems, and the only way to combat it is to be informed.

If your car’s check engine light comes on, or it starts making a weird sound, plug in an Auto Scanner to get an idea of what the problem could be.  When you take it to the mechanic, tell them up front that you know what the problem is.  The more you appear to be informed, the less likely they are to try and rip you off.  

It could pay for itself in one visit to the shop.

Some auto parts stores will scan your car’s computer for free, but you can’t always guarantee that you’ll be able to make it to one when there’s a problem with your car.